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5 Powerful Anti-Bullying Videos On YouTube For Tweens And Teens

by | Sep 1, 2017 | Cyberbullying

When your child gets the opportunity to watch something at the end of a long day, what do they choose? It’s likely that instead of tuning into a TV show or queuing up a full-length movie, they log on to watch a series of YouTube videos. In fact, kids spend more time watching videos on the platform than they ever have before — about an hour on average each day!

While there is definitely such a thing as too much screen time, there are also some major benefits to watching videos that teach important lessons. These anti-bullying videos, specifically, can give you a chance to dive into this key topic together in a productive way. Talking with kids about intense subjects like cyberbullying, sexual content, online predators, and other online issues can be tough. But using YouTube as a resource can help your tween or teen relate to the topics you are discussing with them. Plus, we’re always here to support you by sending you an alert if your child experiences cyberbullying, predation, or something else.

“The Bully”

First, we have “The Bully.” This short film, created by 12-year-old Jonah Maxwell, has racked up over a million views. With the help of his father, Jonah crafted a poignant message about the impact of bullying and cyberbullying on today’s kids. Additionally, he provides tips and encouragement for those who are currently being bullied. If you’re looking for a way to give your child the opportunity to open up about bullying that they may have experienced themselves, this might be a good choice for watching together.

“Silent”

Next up is “Silent,” an award-winning short film about a girl who is deaf. Made by high school freshman Lindsey Hunter, “Silent” focuses on the power of kindness and the importance of being an “upstander” — not just a passive bystander. This video is a great conversation starter if you’d like to encourage your kid to become a leader at their own school.

“Thirteen”

“Thirteen” was written and directed by Robert Randall for the Young Actors Project. This anti-bullying video addresses bullying at the middle-school level by telling the story of a 13-year-old named Caroline, who struggles with fitting in and wants to learn how to “just be herself.” Pretty much every teen and tween feels insecure about something, so “Thirteen” can help your family talk about the importance of celebrating other people’s differences rather than making fun of them.

“Protect Yourself Rules — Bullying”

Sometimes, a live-action video that puts bullying on display can be upsetting to younger kids, so whether your child is sensitive toward this topic or not, “Protect Yourself Rules — Bullying” can help them learn about standing up for themselves and others in a positive way. This video suggests helpful ways for students to protect themselves from a bully in their own lives, and it also provides information about helping friends feel welcome and safe at school. It’s a great way to gently head into a conversation about bullying if you’ve been hesitant about broaching the subject.

“A Sincere Compliment”

Finally, check out “A Sincere Compliment,” an uplifting and inspiring video designed by a high school junior named Jeremiah. In an effort to counter the effects of cyberbullying, he sends compliments and good cheer to people via social media — he even created a Facebook page and Twitter account to send sincere compliments and encouraging messages to students.

Jeremiah’s anti-bullying movement grew into a large group of caring and kind students who are inspired to make a huge difference by helping lift the spirits of teens and tweens who are experiencing bullying. After watching this video together, you might want to ask your own kid whether they have any ideas for encouraging kindness at their school. With your help, they’ll surely be able to contribute to a more positive culture.

What Parents and Guardians Should Know

Because some of these videos may be triggering for younger kids or sensitive tweens and teens, we recommend that you watch them before sharing them with your children. This will help you decide which ones will be most appropriate for your own kid.

Even though these anti-bullying videos can be great tools for teaching your child, YouTube as a whole can present some potential dangers. Kids can experience hateful comments, stumble upon inappropriate content, or even be contacted by predators while using the platform, so keeping a close eye on the videos they’re watching is important.

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