How to Talk to Your Kids about Snapchat Safety

by | Jan 13, 2017 | Internet Safety Tips

Snapchat is one of the fastest-growing social media apps available today. It allows people to snap and caption photos as part of a conversation. This is viewed as far more personal than simple text messaging. Although Snapchat certainly has fun features, it’s important to discuss safety with kids – especially they have their own mobile phones. Here’s how to approach the conversation and keep your child safe online.

Remind Them to Never Snap with Strangers

Although it might seem harmless to snap someone you don’t know, people can be whomever they choose on the internet. It’s possible for people to send pictures of other people – even people your kids may know – and claim to be that person. Additionally, predators will make friends with a less discerning child (or one that is not monitored) and then try to reach out to that child’s friends, and it seems like they know that child when they don’t. It’s best to teach your kids that people are not always who they say they are. Snapchat is a fun way to keep in touch, but your kids should only talk to people they know and have confirmed their username.

Nothing is Truly Private

A common misconception about Snapchat is that messages and photos disappear after a few seconds. This false belief can encourage risky behavior since kids perceive what they send will vanish quickly – even when snapping with strangers. While Snapchat is designed to make things seemingly vanish shortly after viewed, there’s nothing to stop someone from taking a screenshot or screen record opening up the Snap. Screenshots and videos create a permanent digital image. Teach your kids to be careful about the images and text they send. Nothing shared is ever guaranteed to remain truly private.

They’re Giving Snapchat Permission to Use Their Photos

Check out the Terms of Use set forth by Snapchat, your kids may be not be aware of what they mean. Creating an account and sending a snap gives the user the right to “retain whatever ownership rights in that content you had to begin with.” BUT, and it’s a big but. It grants Snapchat the “a license to use that content.” This license is dependent on their settings. These terms means your kids should be sure to only snap things they’re comfortable with others seeing or even using for their own purposes.

Never Meet Up with People They Encounter Online

It’s vital that children be reminded that not everyone is who they claim to be, and that’s why children should never meet up with an individual they encounter online, or are referred to by a friend of a friend. There are online predators who use social media like Facebook, Snapchat, and even Instagram to lure their victims. In most cases, these predators claim to be children of similar ages and with similar interests. We’ve shared a couple of great posts on the topics of Grooming and Sextortion which we recommend reviewing so you’re familiar with the signs of a sexual predator. Once again, remind kids that they should never exchange snaps with people they don’t know.

You Should Stay in the Loop

Finally, remind your kids that their Snapchat account and other social media accounts are not rights; they’re privileges. You should add their Snapchat account to Bark, where we are able to scan public and private Snapchat stories. We can also monitor Snapchat DMs on Android and Amazon devices. However Snapchat does not allow external access to DMs on iOS devices. We’re working on it!

Additionally, check in with them often, to make sure your kids are following the rules you set forth for the use of social media. Make sure there are serious consequences –set out before hand – for instances in which they do not follow the rules.

Although Snapchat can be a lot of fun for preteens and teens as it gives them a means of keeping in touch with friends, it is vital that your kids learn to use Snapchat appropriately to stay safe. The general rules of the internet apply, so be sure to discuss them thoroughly and keep an open and honest dialogue with them about staying safe online.

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